Capt. David’s Fishing Report

St. Johns River Fishing Tips

By Captain David Lifka
mail@floridanewsline.com

The cost of fishing tackle can sometimes be considered to be on the little bit ridiculous side. There are fishing rods and reels that can vary from $30 to $300; gear, such as pliers pushing $80; and tackle boxes that can easily go over $50. Add some hooks and weights that can easily be more than a dollar apiece, a filet knife that can run up to $50, a few lures for $10 to $15 apiece and you’re liable to end up with a treasure chest instead of a tackle box.

Starting with a rod and reel, try purchasing a combo that has already been set up and properly matched. Most big name sporting goods stores will have these on display and ready to try. Often store brand outfits, very similar to the more expensive brands, will be offered at a price of just a third of what the brand name is asking. Also, be on the watch for sales as the more expensive outfits are often featured in ads with savings of 40 – 50 percent.

If you have ever compared a tackle box with a modern day tool box you might surprised to learn there is very little difference between the two, but for some reason, tackle boxes come with a higher price tag. For the average fisherman, a tackle box with a couple trays and a few compartments is all that is needed. By purchasing a tool box to be used in the same role as a tackle box there could be savings of as much as 50 percent.

Finally, putting tackle in your tackle box is another expense that can add up quickly. Fortunately, there are a few things that can be done to help out with the overall costs. One way is to check online sporting goods stores’ clearance specials. Everything you could possibly think of to fill a tackle box is offered on a regular basis with pretty good savings. Also, there are online auction sites that offer shopping in quantity and bulk, such as hooks and sinkers for some of the best prices around. Expensive fishing pliers can be replaced by a trip to any hardware store by purchasing nine-inch needle nose pliers and a pair of toenail clippers. Inexpensive filet knives will do almost anything an expensive knife will do, as long as you have a good sharpener to go with it, saving you money again.

Fishing Report: Take advantage of speckled perch (crappie) in area lakes and creeks as we are in peak season. On pretty days, any type of pan fishing just might pan out.

Whether you catch one, some, or none, the family time spent fishing will last a lifetime.