Tag Archives: Back in Time

Back in Time with Brett | Historic Plummer’s Cove Cemetery

By Brett Nolan
mail@floridanewsline.com

Plummer’s Cove Cemetery is the only tangible reminder of the small farming community of Plummer, a section in Mandarin located at Plummer’s Cove (now adjacent to the Buckman Bridge). In use by 1860, this cemetery was the early burial grounds for many of Mandarin’s pioneer families including the Bowdens, Hartleys, Bradys, Flynns, and Wantons.

Back in Time with Brett

Flynn Houses, Part 1

By Brett Nolan
mail@floridanewsline.com

Sandy roads and a small, close-knit community was how one would describe Mandarin back in the day. What we now know as San Jose Boulevard was just a two lane road then. Today, the thought of taking a school wagon is crazy to imagine, but that was how Mandarinites rolled during the early 20th Century.

Back in Time with Brett: The Bowden house

By Brett Nolan
mail@floridanewsline.com

On Loretto Road sits a house that exemplifies the rural charm of Mandarin. It is a simple home with “strong vertical character” that dates back to the turn of the century – built in 1907 (Wayne Wood, “Jacksonville’s Architectural Heritage,” 1989). Originally, it featured “a two-tier veranda, which wrapped around to the right side of the house” (Wood, 1989). While most historic homes in the area have been constructed during the 19th Century, this building denotes “an important link to Mandarin’s architecture” (Wood, 1989).

Back in Time with Brett: The Read House

By Brett Nolan
mail@floridanewsline.com

The area of Mandarin, since the opening of its first post office in 1765, had several name changes. Originally under British rule, “St. Anthony” was what the area was called. When Spain took possession of Florida again in 1783, the name was changed to San Antonio and once again the name changed after Florida became a U.S. Territory — to Monroe — after our fifth president.

Back in Time with Brett: The Coleman House

By Brett Nolan
mail@floridanewsline.com

The community of Mandarin boasts many historical contributions to the City of Jacksonville. The area provides a unique look of rural 19th century Florida; however, over recent decades, Mandarin’s rich history has become somewhat hidden. The goal of this new column is to reflect on this history through stories of various sites that are still standing around the community today.