Tag Archives: Gardening

Gardening: Summertime – Not so easy?

Gardening

By Lesley Arrandale
mail@floridanewsline.com

Summer is almost here after record-breaking spring temperatures and, as of early May, a continuing rainfall deficit in northeast Florida. I’m now wondering what the summer may bring. The hurricane season predictions (out of Colorado State University) are for an El Nino weather pattern possibly kicking in during the summer, and if it does we could see slightly fewer storms than average, with sea temperatures and wind patterns keeping more of them out in the Atlantic. In the meantime, the Okefenokee Swamp West Mims fire has been burning for weeks, with little rain to help the firefighters; rain is sorely needed.

Gardening: Buyer beware

Gardening

By Lesley Arrandale
mail@floridanewsline.com

So – we had a last minute cold snap, just a few days before our last projected frost date. I hope you all didn’t lose any precious new (or old) plants. Luckily we had a good downpour beforehand, which invigorated our plants. Unfortunately, as of mid-April, we are still low on rainfall, although for the next few months we can expect precipitation to be average (https://tinyurl.com/lnxujms). Of course, this is our dry season. In addition, we are looking at a 40 percent chance of higher than normal temperatures for the next few months (https://tinyurl.com/kuq67z4).

Gardening: Hot stuff, dry stuff

Gardening

By Lesley Arrandale
mail@floridanewsline.com

As I write (in early March) winter has still not arrived. The closer we get to our traditional last frost date — about mid-March — it is predicted to be less and less likely that we shall see cold temperatures and we could therefore see the early emergence of insect pests (see http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/vh036). Keep a close eye on those young vegetable plants. On the plus side, beneficial insects, such as the lady beetles, should also be more abundant (see http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in327).

Gardening: Another spring

Gardening

By Lesley Arrandale
mail@floridanewsline.com

The seasons roll around, and before we know it the robins will have passed through and our overwintering birds will have left for their more northerly nesting grounds. Depending on temperatures, lawns will soon be greening up, we will be planting our summer vegetables and perhaps seeking new shrubs and perennials to fill in gaps that winter may have left behind.

Gardening: Approaching spring

Gardening

By Lesley Arrandale
mail@floridanewsline.com

I confess to being a little haphazard in my approach to spring — seeds that should, for optimal growth, have been sown indoors around six weeks before our last predicted frost, often have to wait till I realize where I am in the year. On the other hand, some of us have a tendency to sow seeds too early, not realizing that once they germinate, they need to be placed in good, strong light to promote sturdy growth, before they are acclimated and planted out after the last frost.