Art Fest history intrigues as 50th approaches

Art Fest history intrigues as 50th approaches

The Mandarin Art Festival will celebrate its 50th anniversary this Easter weekend, March 31 – April 1. More »

Connect for a cure at Relay for Life of North St. Johns

Connect for a cure at Relay for Life of North St. Johns

Relay for Life of North St. Johns County will be held on Saturday, April 14, 2018 from 12 p.m. – 10 p.m., at Bartram Trail High School. More »

Three historically significant buildings celebrated

Three historically significant buildings celebrated

Along State Road 13, the Bennett House, the Hartley Store and Beluthahatchee all reflect the vibrant history of the NW St. Johns County area — and all were recognized simultaneously at a community celebration held on Feb. 24. More »

Mandarin Senior Center a “home away from home” for seniors

Mandarin Senior Center a “home away from home” for seniors

The Mandarin Senior Center, located on Hartley Road, is looking forward to a much needed expansion. More »

A visit to 9A Baymeadows Regional Park

A visit to 9A Baymeadows Regional Park

The 9A Baymeadows Regional Park may soon get a new name: Fort Family Regional Park at Baymeadows. More »

Get ready to be entertained with “Five Guys Named Moe”

Get ready to be entertained with “Five Guys Named Moe”

Five guys named Moe perform songs by R&B pioneer Louis Jordan at this revue at Alhambra Theatre and Dining. More »

 

Mandarin NewsLine

Get ready to be entertained with Alhambra’s “Five Guys Named Moe”

fnl-alhambra-five-guys-named-moe-1805

By Martie Thompson
editor@floridanewsline.com

The premise is simple … down on his luck Nomax is lonely and drunk and is visited by five men who jump out of an old timey radio to perform songs by R&B pioneer Louis Jordan in this revue at Alhambra Theatre and Dining entitled “Five Guys Named Moe.” Part conscience and part advisors, the five singers, all named Moe, appear to an increasingly accepting and collaborative Nomax (Jereme Raickett).

Mandarin Senior Center a “home away from home” for area seniors

mnl-mandarin-senior-center-1804a-lores

By Martie Thompson
editor@floridanewsline.com

Tucked away on Hartley Road is a gem for our community’s seniors: the Mandarin Senior Center. What began with just a few golden agers meeting in the Moose Lodge in 1987 has now grown into a vibrant recreation center that serves approximately 500 members. The programs and members have long since outgrown the current building, which opened in 1990, and expansion plans have been in place for some time. According to Advisory Board Chair Chris Buckley, these will finally be coming to fruition … and not a moment too soon.

Get to Know … Jenna Harrington

mnl-get-to-know-jenna-harrington-1804-lores

By Angela Higginbotham
angela@floridanewsline.com

Wise far beyond her years, 16-year-old Jenna Harrington is a Mandarin High School junior who has lived in the Jacksonville area her entire life. Passionate about cancer research and giving back to others, Harrington sets a strong, positive example for children and young adults. Harrington has been an active volunteer with Relay for Life for the past 12 years. During this time, Harrington and her teams have raised $100,000 for cancer research and patient services.

Gardening | Spring greening

gardening-1024x1024

By Master Gardener Lesley Arrandale
mail@floridanewsline.com

There has been much discussion — both here and worldwide — about the effects of neonicotinoid chemicals (neonics) on bees and their colonies, and now more studies have shown that these effects are wide-ranging and very damaging. According to the European Food Safety Authority (https://tinyurl.com/yao3ynk6), not only are honey bees being harmed, but native bees are suffering too, which is problematic as they also play an important role in crop production. (There have been proposals in Europe for a total field ban of the three most damaging neonics: clothianidin, imidacloprid, and thiamethoxam, which are already subject to restrictions.) Because they are persistent in soil for some years, neonics can be taken up by other plants well after the initially treated crop was harvested, and their effects on bees is therefore not limited to a one-time application.

Travel | Butterfly Rainforest in Gainesville

fnl-travel-gainesvilles-butterfly-rainforest-1804a-lores

By Debi Lander
mail@floridanewsline.com

Recently, two of my grandchildren visited and we headed to the Florida Museum of Natural History in Gainesville. The museum includes an awe-inspiring Butterfly Rainforest filled with numerous species of free-flying butterflies. A serpentine trail through the aviary passes cascading waterfalls and small bridges over pools with fish and turtles.